Semester I

English Grammar and Composition

This course highlights the key aspects of writing for academic purposes. Students will learn how to recognize and correct common errors in grammar, usage, and punctuation. Reading skills are a major focus, as they are an essential input for quality writing. The course also focuses on embedding in students the concept that writing is a recursive process. We aim to train students for critical reading and analytical writing. The students are taught how to construct cogent and coherent arguments using a variety of rhetorical tropes, strategies, and modes.

Foreign Language I

All students have to choose one of three foreign languages taught at IBA -- French, Arabic, and Mandarin – and progress towards an advanced level of comprehension and communication in it. A sequence of four courses proceeds from an introduction to grammar, punctuation and vocabulary, to proficiency in listening and speaking, and finally to an analysis of literary and cultural texts produced in the language studied.

Calculus I

This is intended as an introductory course on differential and integral calculus. The aim is to acquaint students with the basic methods of calculus required for a range of analyses as well as to provide them with the requisite knowledge for enrolling in advanced courses in mathematics.

History of Ideas I

Ideas have shaped how we think about and respond to our world. History is replete with instances that demonstrate how small changes in ways of thinking lead to creative tensions and large shifts in social and cultural thinking. This two-semester course explores the metaphysical and material histories of such ideas as freedom, justice, ethics, reason, the self, the real, identity, faith, citizenship, rights, etc. It introduces students to methods of critical and philosophical analysis that investigate the sources and limits of historical, empirical, and theoretical knowledge.

Fundamentals of Sociology

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic purposes, methods and themes of sociology. The study of sociology helps us understand the complex inter-relationships between individuals and the organizations and institutions that make up society. It also helps us to recognize patterns of inequality and social change, and how these vary over time and in different places. Students will survey the key concepts and theories that define the field of sociology, including culture, structure, social interaction, stratification, and deviance, and the tools of social scientific research that sociologists use to study them.

Introduction to Historical Methods

This course will introduce students to historiography and historical methods of research and analysis. The course will emphasize how historians frame their explorations of the past; investigate issues and debates in current historical practice; articulate questions about conventional periodization; and distinguish between oral, artifactual, and written evidence, between objective and subjective narratives, and between private and public histories.

Semester II

Intermediate English Grammar and Composition

This course will build on the previous course to further teach students how to communicate effectively using written English. Students will learn how to develop deliberate, methodological strategies to generate ideas, formulate arguments, draft essays, revise, and proofread, and cite academic sources. The course will help students to gather and synthesize evidence pertinent to the arguments they choose to make, as well as facilitate guided practice in a range of written modes, including but not limited to narrative, discursive, argumentative, reflective, and summary writing.

Foreign Language II

All students have to choose one of three foreign languages taught at IBA -- French, Arabic, and Mandarin – and progress towards an advanced level of comprehension and communication in it. A sequence of four courses proceeds from an introduction to grammar, punctuation and vocabulary, to proficiency in listening and speaking, and finally to an analysis of literary and cultural texts produced in the language studied.

Introduction to Statistics

This course is an introductory course for data analysis, presentation, and probability. The aim is to acquaint students with the basic methods of data handling required for a range of statistical analyses, as well as to provide them with the requisite knowledge for enrolling in advanced courses in statistics and quantitative research methods. Prerequisite: MTS 101

History of Ideas II

Ideas have shaped how we think about and respond to our world. History is replete with instances that demonstrate how small changes in ways of thinking lead to creative tensions and large shifts in social and cultural thinking. This two-semester course explores the metaphysical and material histories of such ideas as freedom, justice, ethics, reason, the self, the real, identity, faith, citizenship, rights, etc. It introduces students to methods of critical and philosophical analysis that investigate the sources and limits of historical, empirical, and theoretical knowledge.

Introduction to Economics

This course introduces students to the study of both macroeconomics and microeconomics. Lectures and discussions will investigate market mechanisms through the behaviors and processes of decision making engaged in by individuals and firms: how and where goods and services are bought and sold; how supply and demand affect price structures; resource allocation; market equilibrium and asymmetry; product elasticity; the structure, behavior and performance of national and global economies; and the effect of macroeconomic policies on decision-making practices.

Major Themes in World History

This survey course introduces students to major patterns, processes, and events in world history organized around recurring issues and themes through the close reading and analysis of primary and secondary texts. Themes considered may include economics, conquest and war, religion, government, revolution, disease, technological invention, empires and nations, and globalization.

Semester III

Speech Communication

The course aims to enable students to understand, analyze, and acquire communication skills. Oral presentation experiences are heavily integrated throughout the course with a focus on public speaking design and delivery. The goal is to help students communicate orally for effective interpersonal communication. The pedagogical tools for this include presentations, parliamentary debates, MUN workshops, and stage performances.

Foreign Language III

All students have to choose one of three foreign languages taught at IBA -- French, Arabic, and Mandarin – and progress towards an advanced level of comprehension and communication in it. A sequence of four courses proceeds from an introduction to grammar, punctuation and vocabulary, to proficiency in listening and speaking, and finally to an analysis of literary and cultural texts produced in the language studied.

Statistical Inference

This course introduces students to methods of statistical analysis including sampling, decision analysis, and data modeling. This course provides basic methods for research and practice in social and physical sciences. The aim is to acquaint students with advanced methods of data collection and analysis.

Introduction to Psychology

This survey will introduce students to the history, concepts, major theories, and methods of research that contribute to our understanding of both human and animal behavior. Students will engage with historical and contemporary debates about cognitive processes and neurological disorders, identity formation, human and animal interaction, individual and social development, perception and sensation, learning and memory, and biological and evolutionary perspectives on human and animal development.

Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

This course serves as an introduction to the study of social and cultural development, and of diversity in human societies. Lectures and discussions will focus on: 1. Questions of anthropological heterogeneity, and on how varying social and cultural forces define and describe these regional, national, and local differences; 2. Case studies offered by major figures in the field that help illuminate how anthropologists conduct research, synthesize evidence, and arrive at provisional analyses of the social groups they study; 3. Theoretical and historical readings on the major subjects anthropologists address: kinship and family, gender, religion, race and ethnicity, language and communication, magic, ritual and symbolism, human and animal evolution, social transformation, and economic exchange.

South Asian History

This survey course introduces students to major developments in South Asian History from the emergence of the early Harappan period to the struggle for independence. Students will investigate key historical forces and individuals that shaped South Asian politics, society and culture including the introduction of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islam, the development of languages, the production of major cultural and scientific works, interactions with regional neighbors, the formation of ethnic communities, and major political incursions and social reconfigurations.

Semester IV

Inter-disciplinary Social Science Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to familiarize students with multiple disciplinary approaches to a single topic, for instance Development, Secularism, the Family, etc. This gives students an opportunity to connect and compare the various disciplines in which they have been taking courses, such as Political Science, Sociology, Psychology, Anthropology, Philosophy, History and others, within one field of inquiry. They also have to produce a research paper at the end of the seminar.

Foreign Language IV

All students have to choose one of three foreign languages taught at IBA -- French, Arabic, and Mandarin – and progress towards an advanced level of comprehension and communication in it. A sequence of four courses proceeds from an introduction to grammar, punctuation and vocabulary, to proficiency in listening and speaking, and finally to an analysis of literary and cultural texts produced in the language studied.

Pakistan History

This course serves as an introductory survey to the history of Pakistan from 1947 to the present. Over the course of the semester, we will proceed thematically through different aspects and periods of Pakistani history, and reflect upon where these issues stand today. Successful students will learn to think critically about various events, periods, and themes in Pakistani history.

Introduction to Political Science

An introduction to the study of political institutions, processes, and behaviors, of the relationship among political ideologies, state practices, and systems of governance; international relations among states; processes of political decision-making; and individual and social behavior within political contexts. The course should acquaint students with major political thinkers, and with the three major forms of governance that have emerged in the modern era: democracy, fascism, and communism.

Culture, Media, Society

This course serves as a theoretical and historical introduction to the pervasive impact of mass media on global culture and society. This course defines the media broadly as facilitators of human and social communication (print, broadcast, visual, promotional, and digital forms of cultural and social practice), and will help students become critically self-conscious consumers and producers of media texts.

Introduction to Urban Studies

An introduction to the history, formation, planning, economics, social structures, and cultures of urban environments, this course will help students understand how urbanization, inner-city migrations, industrialization, available housing, economic, ethnic and racial segregation, environment, crime, municipal efficiency, telecommunications, and political governance affect the development and growth of cities.

8-Week Responsible Citizen Initiative

Semester V

Major Core I: Research Methods

 

Major Core II

 

Introduction to Linguistics

An introduction to the fundamental properties of languages, their morphology, phonology, and syntax, their semantic and pragmatic functions, their historical development, and the ways in which they are shaped by different cultural and social contexts.

Humanities Elective I

 

Natural Science Elective I

 

Computational Research Methods

A course designed to introduce students to computational and symbolic processing software that facilitates quantitative research and analysis. (To be taken in the semester as the disciplinary research methods course.)

Semester VI

Major Core III

 

Major Elective I

 

Major Elective II

 

Socioeconomic Philosophy of Islam or Foundations of Philosophical Thought

How does one study a given religious system? What are the scholarly tools and conceptual frameworks for exploring a civilization radiating from a religious core? What are the limitations of an academic study of Islam? In what way is it different from the account and conception of the believer or, in the case of cultures, of the actor? These and similar questions will inform our investigation of Islam as we explore its intellectual, social, political and philosophical history.

Humanities Elective II

 

Visual Studies Elective I

 

10-Week Summer Internship

Semester VII

Major Elective III

 

Major Elective IV

 

Natural Science Elective II

 

Visual Studies Elective II

 

Humanities Elective III

 

Culminating Experience I (3 credits)

The culminating experience is a two-semester, 9-credit final project that includes both a written and an experiential component undertaken by students in their final year of study at IBA. Project proposals must be submitted before the beginning of the fall semester. The proposal should include a well-articulated research question, research methods to be used, an extensive bibliography that lists both primary and secondary sources to be consulted, and a brief summary of why the student wishes to pursue this line of inquiry. The final written component, or thesis, should be of at least 40 pages (including appendices), and include both a synoptic summary of the data collected and an extensive analysis of that data as it pertains to the research question.

Semester VIII

Major Core IV: Senior Seminar

 

Major Elective V

 

Major Elective VI

 

Visual Studies Elective III

 

Culminating Experience II (6 credits)

The culminating experience is a two-semester, 9-credit final project that includes both a written and an experiential component undertaken by students in their final year of study at IBA. Project proposals must be submitted before the beginning of the fall semester. The proposal should include a well-articulated research question, research methods to be used, an extensive bibliography that lists both primary and secondary sources to be consulted, and a brief summary of why the student wishes to pursue this line of inquiry. The final written component, or thesis, should be of at least 40 pages (including appendices), and include both a synoptic summary of the data collected and an extensive analysis of that data as it pertains to the research question.